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Next Artificial Sweetener Is Made From Sand Of All Things

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Artificial Sweetener, Sugar

Weight loss regimens generally require cutting sugar from your diet because, as we all know, too much sugar leads to obesity, the biggest problem facing most first-world people. Artificial sweeteners were created to help reduce obesity health risks like diabetes and a fatty liver, but the fact that they contain aspartames and stevia makes them dangerous.

A start-up company in Israel has come up with a new artificial sweetener that isn’t actually artificial at all but rather a modified version sugar with a hi-tech inner core.

DouxMatok invented an innovative way to coat food-safe nanoparticles of cellulose or silica (i.e. the main components of beach sand), successfully replicating the sweetness and texture of processed sugar but with less than 25% to 55% sugar content.

The tiny food safe particles are coated with natural sugar like glucose or sucrose and, as such, trick the sweetness receptors on our tongue into thinking you are eating a full-serving of sugar.

DouxMatok CEO Eran Baniel commented on the new artificial sweetener’s effect towards the body in an interview with Fast Company, comparing it to drug delivery in pharmaceuticals:

“Drug delivery allows you to take less of an active material and ship it to where you need it. . . . You ship less of it and you create less damage along the way, we do flavor delivery. You take less of the active material-the active material being sugar in this case. But you still use sugar.”

Achieving good health is both a mental and physical exercise that is challenging for many people, explaining why there is a growing market for easy, sometimes hazardous ‘fixes’. Baniel added:

“Health is not only a physical condition, health is a mixture of the mental and the physical. The beauty of what we do is that we do not deprive people of what they like in terms of taste. We were proven-absolutely proven-as identical in sensory profile to sugars. But whilst we offer people what makes them happy mentally, we help them be happy mentally without consuming too much of what can really harm them.”

A sweetener that eschews most sugar content for edible particles are coated with natural sugar may curb some of the not-so-great health effects of our often sugar-heavy diets. Let’s just hope people don’t consume too much of it, lest they want to overstimulate their taste buds and increase their sweetness threshold.

How bad is your sweet tooth?

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Diet & Health

You Can Eat Anything Without Getting Fat With ‘Project Nourished’

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virtual-reality-eating

Does stuffing your face with plates after plates of sumptuous five-star cuisine without worrying about gaining weight or undermining your overall health entice you? If so, virtual dining could just be what the doctor ordered.

Project Nourished is a gastronomic virtual reality experiment that’s using Virtual Reality (VR) technology to recreate the ultimate fine dining experience.

Basically, what the masterminds behind it want is to deliver a virtual reality sensory experience of dining without concerning yourself with calories. The system works by tricking all of the senses in perfect harmony using the impressive Oculus Rift VR headset to trick the eyes into seeing the food you’re craving, an aromatic diffuser to trick the nose into smelling it, and a “bone conduction transducer” (shudder) to mimic the chewing sounds that are transmitted from mouth to ear drums via soft tissues and bones.

It also employs a food detection sensor, motion tracking and a gyroscopic utensil to help mimic moving food from a VR plate to your mouth.

As for what you actually put in your mouth in real life, Project Nourished gives you a low-calorie fusion derived from agar, konjac jelly and gum Arabic, made to mimic foods such as steak, lasagne, pies and sushi.

Some people might wonder why anyone would want to eat virtual food when real food is within reach, but there might actually be a viable market for this gastronomic virtual reality experiment. In fact, if current technology trends are anything to go by, virtual reality is poised to become mainstream … eventually.

Everyone with a pulse loves good food, right? In fact, the only thing that stops most of us from gorging ourselves on a daily basis is the fear of becoming fat and having a heart attack. Fortunately, Project Nourished may eliminate such hindrances, allowing us to virtually eat to our hearts content.

The system is in the very early stages of development, and while initial tests have proven to be successful, the experience will only improve as virtual reality technology improves.

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Features

Learn About the Interesting History of Bread

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Various whole wheat breads and grains

Bread has been around for many millennia and is a staple food across the world, with records of its existence dating back as far as 30,000 years ago. Ask any historian and they would tell you that the importance of bread in the formation of early human societies cannot be overstated.

The first bread ever produced may have been an accident and was likely a cooked version of a grain-paste made from roasted/ground cereal grains and water. Although flour and leavening probably have pre-historic origins, Paleolithic origins, the earliest archaeological evidence of leavened bread is from ancient Egypt.

Cereals and bread became a staple food during the Neolithic some 10,000 years ago, when wheat and barley first became domesticated in the Middle East’s Fertile Crescent and wheat-based agriculture spread from Southwest Asia to most of the old world.

The gradual shift from hunter-gatherer to agricultural diets based mostly on a cereal staple such as wheat bread marked a critical turning point in human history. Cereal crops allowed agricultural societies to sustain much larger populations, leding to greater economic specialisation, social complexity and eventually the rise of civilizations.

It was the ancient Greeks that can be credited with turning bread-making into an art form, having been the first to us free-standing, font-loading ovens that could be pre-heated. They tested different baking processes and discovered many shapes, types, styles of bread.

Naturally, the Romans adopted the Greek oven, which they called the ‘Fornax’, made it a common appliance in most of their homes, and even named one of their gods after it.

Bread has since evolved into many forms and types and has even become a staple food in many regions where other cereals such as rice (East Asia), maize (the Americas) and sorghum (sub-Saharan Africa) have traditionally dominated.

Different Bread and Bakery

It goes without saying that the bread of today is the product of centuries of experiments and innovations. For example, the uniform shape of your typical loaf was introduced not too long ago (relatively speaking) by the British, while sliced bread is generally believed to have been invented by German-American engineer Otto Frederick Rohwedder in 1928.

Interestingly, white bread was the preferred bread of the rich for generations, while the poor ate dark (whole grain) bread. However, the connotations reversed in the late 20th century, with whole grain bread becoming preferred as having superior nutritional value, while white bread is now associated with lower-class nutritional ignorance.

Advancements in technology have taken away most of the hard work of making bread, making them more abundant and affordable than ever. We are literally swimming gin bread!

That said, what is your favorite type of bread? Let us know in the comments below and stay tuned to FoodTribute for more articles like this one.

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Food Tech

Marijuana-Infused CBD Beer is Now Real, See What it’s About

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Marijuana CBD Beer

A company has finally successfully combined an element of marijuana (CBD) with beer, and a lot of beer lovers and pot smokers are jumping for joy. U.S.-based Dad & Dudes Breweria is now selling two new cannabis-infused beers, but there is a catch…

According to 9 News, while the ‘marijuana beer’ contains cannabidiol (CBD), it doesn’t have any Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — the active, psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. As such, it doesn’t get you high.

When asked about the creation of their CBD beer, company co-founder Mason Hembree said:

“It wasn’t an easy process. I have been working on this for like two years, and we had been pussyfooting it, for lack of better words, until finally I said, you know, let’s just do it.”

THC is illegal in many parts of the world, especially the U.S., and cannot be added to beer or any other drink. CBD (also found in cannabis), on the other hand, is legal and is what Dad & Dudes infused their beer with to deliver some of the other, mostly-beneficial effects of marijuana.

The company is already offering an IPA called Dank and will introduce even stronger CBD-beer mashups called Indica Double IPA and Sativa IPA in the near future. These beers are part of their Canna-Beer Series, which takes advantage of the booming cannabis industry in the state of Colorado.

Hembree told the press:

“I think beer and cannabis should be treated equally. Alcohol has also gone through its fair share of prohibition and misunderstanding. And I think Colorado is leading the way nationally when it comes to reform, and I hope we keep moving in that direction.”

Sativa and Indica are the names of two different cannabis plants. Sativa provides an energetic high, while Indica gives users a mellower high. Remember, Dad & Dudes’ beers only contain cannabidiol and not pot.

Have had any type of marijuana beer? How did you find it?

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