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Almost Half Of Food Allergies In Adults Appear Later In Life

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Peanuts in a bowl

The thought of food allergies mostly conjures up images of children feverishly scratching themselves, but grown-ups are not impervious to them. New research shows a growing incidence of allergies in adults and that nearly half of all allergies suffered by them begin in adulthood.

Presented in 2017 at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting in Boston, the findings came as surprise to some researchers. Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, ACAAI member and lead author of the study, stated:

“Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in adulthood is surprising.”

Gupta’s team also found that, as with children, the incidence of food allergies in adults is rising across all ethnic groups. Shellfish is the most common food allergy among adults, affecting an estimated 3.6 percent of U.S. adults, which represents a 44 percent increase from an earlier study in 2004.

Other data also suggest that adult tree nut allergy prevalence has risen to 1.8 percent from a 2008 estimate of .5 percent, an increase of 260 percent.

There are no real explanations for why these rates continue to rise, but Gupta believes it might have something to do with “the hygiene hypothesis, changes in how and what we eat, [and] changes in our microbiome.”

According to Christopher Warren, a food allergy researcher, PhD candidate and the study’s co-author, Black, Asian and Hispanic adults were found to have a higher risk of developing a food allergy to certain foods, especially shellfish and peanuts, than whites. Asian adults, for example, were 2.1 times more likely to report a shellfish allergy than white adults, while Hispanic adults reported a peanut allergy at 2.3 times the frequency.

Interestingly, it’s not always the food itself that causes the allergic reaction but rather other allergens associated with them. Dr. David Fischer, president of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, explained in an interview with Global News that shellfish allergies in adults, for example, are almost always intertwined with dust mites and cockroaches and that allergens found in dust mites are similar to those found in crustaceans.

This is also similar to tree nut allergies. People could be reacting to pollen on the nuts rather than the nuts themselves.

The misconception that food allergies mostly affect children could lead many adults to overlook and not get tested for potential allergies they might have. In fact, many confuse allergies with intolerance, not knowing the basic difference between the two.

As Fischer puts it, allergies are allergic reactions to proteins can be accompanied with symptoms of vomiting, hives or shortness of breath, while food intolerance is often tied with lactose or gluten, resulting in digestion issues or stomach distress.

It’s important that you take action after experiencing an adverse reaction to a food that you were once able to consume without issue. The best way to figure out exactly what you have is to take an allergy test, which will not only give you a diagnosis, but will also enable an allergy specialist to carry out further assessment of your health, especially if allergies run in your family.

As for the Gupta and Warren’s study, they say a lot more work has to be done to make sure that adult allergy prevalence rates drop. The goal is to understand possible predictors to food allergies and act expediently and effectively.

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Food Research

Over 4 In 10 Americans Open To Trying Cannabis-Enhanced Foods

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Cannabis Edibles Foods

More than 40 percent of North American consumers are willing to try foods made with cannabis recreationally if available.

A survey of 1,000 Americans and 1,000 Canadians carried out by global management consulting firm A.T. Kearney highlights the growing interest in cannabis-infused food and drinks.

In the survey, participants were asked which cannabis-containing products they or someone they know have tried in areas including food, smoking, vaping and beverages. Approximately 58% said yes for food, 12% for alcohol and 10% for nonalcoholic drinks such as juice, water, tea or coffee.

The results were echoed by an earlier study by Dalhousie University, which found that 46 per cent of Canadians said they would try cannabis-infused food products if they became available on the market. A 2017 Gallup poll showed that 64 per cent of Americans support legalization.

Over 85 percent of those surveyed said they would have an improved or neutral perception of their favorite brand if it were to launch a product containing cannabis, indicating that companies introducing products with cannabis ingredients would see an improvement in public perception.

Randy Burt, a partner in A.T. Kearney’s consumer and retail practice, stated:

“The survey clearly demonstrates the viability of the market for cannabis across multiple consumer segments – CPGs and retailers focused on health and wellness, snacking, functional food and beverage, and beverage alcohol need to have a perspective on how they will approach the cannabis opportunity.”

Interestingly, consumers expressed more willingness to try candy, chocolate snacks and packaged foods than non-alcoholic or alcoholic drinks; yet, it’s the beverage sector, especially beer, that has been the most aggressive in investing and preparing for a cannabis future.

Concerns over more consumers turning to marijuana instead alcohol for relaxation is perhaps the driving force behind the push.

Canada legalized marijuana on October 17, 2018, while ten U.S. states have legalized the psychoactive drug for recreational use.

Judging by current trends, America might be at the tipping point on legalizing cannabis at the federal level, which could open up additional markets for marijuana-related products.

Like it or not, the future is looks bright for the cannabis industry.

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Diet & Health

Science Has Found The Best Way To Wash Pesticides Off Apples

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Apple on tree

Polishing an apple with your shirt might get rid of some dust and dirt, but removing the pesticides will require a little more work.

New research has found that washing apples with baking soda, the common yet miraculous household product, could be all you need to eliminate most of the residues on the surface of apples and other fruits.

Pesticides have long been used to increase crop yield, but rising concerns over their adverse effect on human health has many people talking. While the exact effects depend on the type of pesticides and the amount eaten, the World Health Organization says that certain pesticides could harm the developing nervous systems of fetuses and children.

A growing number of people have opted for organic food as way of avoiding the chemicals, but organic food usually command a price premium and there is no guarantee that pesticides were used. In fact, the organic, naturally-occurring pesticides that some organic farms use aren’t necessarily safer.

Washing has been and remains the standard practice used by both consumers and the food industry to remove pesticides, but some of the plant-protecting compounds that get absorbed by the skin of fruits and vegetables might be more resilient to current cleaning methods. To find the best method, Lili He, Assistant Professor at the ‎University of Massachusetts Amherst, and colleagues conducted a study in which they applied two common pesticides — the fungicide thiabendazole, which past research has shown can penetrate apple peels, and the insecticide phosmet — to organic Gala apples and then washed apples with three different liquids: tap water, a 1 percent baking soda/water solution, and a U.S.-EPA-approved commercial bleach solution often used on produce.

The baking soda solution proved the most effective at removing pesticides, eliminating 80 percent of the thiabendazole and 96 percent of the phosmet, respectively, after 12 and 15 minutes of the fruits being soaked. Plain tap water and the bleach solution were far less effective.

The different percentages are likely due to thiabendezole’s greater absorption into the apple. Mapping images showed that thiabendazole had penetrated up to 80 micrometers deep into the apples, while phosmet was detected at a depth of only 20 micrometers.

So, there you have it, if washing is your preferred method of removing pesticides off your fruits and vegetables, using a baking soda solution is the way to go. If all other options are to be considered, then peeling your produce is probably your best bet.

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Diet & Health

You Binge Eat Because You’re Sleep-Deprived

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Woman caught eating food

There have been many studies correlating sleep deprivation with a wide range of health risks, including decrease in alertness and increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. But what about a possible link with food cravings?

Researchers have long known that lack of sleep is associated with binge eating or just plain eating uncontrollably whenever and wherever, but a new study published in online journal Sleep suggests that the same chemical mechanism behind the munchies might be why sleep-deprived people not only feel hungrier, but also become buckle in the face of a big chocolate bar.

The study involved 14 volunteers aged 18 to 30, all of whom were first given four nights of either normal (8.5 hours) or interrupted sleep (4.5 hours) and then two meals and unrestricted access to all kind of snacks — both healthy (e.g., fruit and yogurt) and less-healthy options (e.g., chips and cake).

When the researchers monitored their endocannabinoid (eCB) levels, they found that those participants who had been sleep-deprived reported feeling hungrier and tended to eat the less-healthy snacks.

Moreover, they eat nearly double the fat and protein of the well-rested participants and exhibited an exaggerated cycle in their endocannabinoid levels, with an especially high level in the afternoon — around the same time they reported feeling the hungriest.

Endocannabinoids are chemicals that our bodies naturally create to play a part in such physiological processes as appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory. They also to activate the same receptors that get people high from consuming marijuana, explaining the temptation for food stemming from sleep deprivation.

Have you ever felt so tired as to almost feel high? Well, this might be the reason…

Scientists hope these findings will lead to further scientific discoveries on food cravings that would aid in the treatment and control of binge eating.

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